Artist's Way, Committee to Elect Wenona Gardner for US President 2024, Morning Star, Native American Witch, Ojibwe, Oneida, US President Candidate 2024

HELP! My Tribes Are Facing Extinction From Ongoing Genocide!

White Turtle Rainbow – Mohican-7 By Wenona Gardner

As a Native American enrolled in the Mohican and also from Oneida, Brothertown, Narragansett, and Ojibwe Tribes ….all I see is the Genocide that is still going on today. All around me. And it kills my spirit.

I remember being a guest speaker at UWM and telling younger Native American kids in school my college experience. And I explained I am from the Mohican Tribe. This person came up to me afterwards and told me to my face that I couldn’t be Mohican because the Mohican Tribe is extinct. I hate the movie & the book Last of Mohicans because they glorify Genocide of my Mohican Tribe set to a catchy Soundtrack. And my soul bleeds.

My Mohican Tribe is facing extinction today due to ongoing Genocide. So I got off my couch and decided to run for office. I am a Daughter of a Medicine Woman Wambli Wasu Winyan – Hail Eagle Woman. I am a Grand Daughter of Chief John Konkapot an American Revolutionary War Hero who helped create this country serving as Captain in George Washington’s Army. I am a Native American Witch whose greatest strength is my Spirit.

Building on my Strength of Spirit, I have committed to praying an hour each day to heal our country but also our Mother Earth. So far I have prayed 1,075 hours. I have a Prayer Circle. I would like to invite you to pray with me for our country & all Mother Earth in whatever way you believe in.

Chi Miigwetch
Wenona Gardner

1st Enrolled Native American Woman for US President 2020 & 2024

Artist's Way, Committee to Elect Wenona Gardner for US President 2024, Mohican, Morning Star, NaNoWriMo, Native American Witch, Ojibwe, Oneida, US President Candidate 2024, Wabun Anung, Wenona Gardner, Witch, YouNow

Asking for Prayers for the 1st Enrolled Native American Woman to Officially Run for US President

Boozhoo,


As of New Moon October 6, 2021 I am officially registered with the FEC as an Independent US President Candidate from Milwaukee, WI for 2024. I am Officially the 1st Enrolled Native American Woman from Stockbridge-Munsee Band Band of Mohican Tribe to Run for US President 2020 and 2024 in US History. 


My FEC President Candidate ID:  P40006587. I Pray for my Ancestor Mohican Chief Konkapot of the Turkey Clan to Protect, Guide, & Walk With Me on this Spiritual & Healing Journey. I have already completed 1,075 hours of Daily Prayer & Healing Ceremony since Sept 11, 2018. I continue to do daily Ceremony as taught to me by my Medicine Mom Wambli Wasu Winyan – Hail Eagle Woman going forward. 


As a Certified Peer Support & Wellness Specialist & Trauma Survivor, I strongly believe we need Trauma Informed Care (TIC) Across the Entire Country.  Part of TIC must include healing Historical Trauma of Native American people from ongoing Genocide through prioritizing Native American Language Restoration, MMIW, Every Child Matters, Wellbriety, etc.


Can I count on you to be my friend who I can share my Campaign Journey with? 


I always accept written prayers too.


              Chi Miigwetch 


         To All My Relations

               Blessed Be! 


       Wenona Gardner 2024

    Wabun Anung –

Morning Star 


               A Sign of Hope. 

               A Coming of A 

                  New Dawn.

Artist's Way, Mohican, Morning Star, Native American Witch, Ojibwe, Wabun Anung, Wenona Gardner

“Dancing Until Daylight” Written By Wenona Gardner DJ Celestial Buffy Dedicated to DJ NOSAJ Jason D Raymond

Waabanishimo – Dance Until Daylight

By DJ Celestial Buffy Wenona Gardner

Dedicated to DJ NOSAJ Jason D Raymond

Sunday February 14, 2021 Valentine’s Day

Ni gawa Zaagi’ idiwin

I fell in love

Anishnabe Gidge Migwa DJ NOSAJ

With an Ojibwe DJ NOSAJ

Amajise Geshkozini Bawaagjiigan

Come Awake My Dream

Gidge

He Plays Music

Madewe Wetoon

He Makes Sounds

Animishind

He Dances Away

Wiijsh Motaw Wabun Anung

Dance With Me Morning Star

Kisaaki’in

I love you – open into me.

Gii Chii Migwetch

A Very Big Thank You

Gizah gin

I love you

Baashkanagg

Shooting Star

Vocals: https://youtu.be/k-dUpGB5f3E

Artist's Way

Dear Friends, Family,Tribal Members, and Righteous Supporters,

White Turtle Rainbow

This November, I’m writing a Memoir called Mohican Forever! An entire Memoir, started from scratch, and completed in just one month, as part of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).
I’m raising money for the 501(c)(3) nonprofit behind National Novel Writing Month so that they can continue to build a more engaged and inspiring world. In my over 11 years participating with NaNoWriMo I have been blown away by it’s amazing writing community! Every dollar I raise will keep my spirits high as I write my way toward the realization of my creative goals. You can support my journey by:
  • Making a much-valued donation to this page! http://give.classy.org/NaNoWriMoParty
  • Spreading the word, and sharing my page with your friends via Facebook, Twitter, or email.
  • Donation Rewards: For every person who donates at least $5 you will receive a donation gift me. You can chose one of the following. A) A Free Native American Tarot reading. OR B) A video created by me. OR C) An original digital piece of artwork created by me.
  • NaNoWriMo T-Shirt Reward: The person in the US who donates the most during my NaNoWriMo campaign will receive from me a NaNoWriMo t-shirt as long as the size and t-shirt is still available.
All of NaNoWriMo’s programs are completely free of cost. Your contribution will help NaNoWriMo:
  • Value and encourage all writers’ voices, no matter their gender, race, or background.
  • Provide free curriculum, workbooks, and virtual tools to students and educators in over 2,500 classrooms.
  • Guide 1,000+ community leaders in building vibrant, writing and literacy-focused oases in their local neighborhoods, libraries, and bookstores.
Thank you so much for your support of my writing! I’ll be posting updates on my Memoir and fundraising on my fundraising page now throughout the month of October and through the end of the month of November.
With gratitude,

Wenona Gardner

White Turtle Rainbow

Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Tribe

Artist's Way

How I Became a Peer Support Specialist

by Wenona Gardner

Back in 2006, Waukesha County, WI I began a test pilot program for Peer Support Specialist training. They were offering to pay the Peer Support Specialist students a stipend if they completed the course successfully. I remember living in apartment 507 at Willow Park Apartments, in Waukesha, WI where my window overlooked the mini forest full of trees. My Community Support Program (CSP) worker brought me a flyer announcing the upcoming training. I looked the flyer over and despite the encouragement of my CSP worker Elizabeth, I felt that I was not able to do the class. I feared that my repeated breakdowns had damaged my brain so that I couldn’t be successful in that sort of class. I was uncertain about my ability to perform in a class environment despite having a Bachelor’s degree already. I flat out told her “No! to Peer Support Specialist training.

About a week later, Elizabeth encouraged me to do a Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) training for the first day of class. She said I didn’t have to take the 75 hour Meta Recovery course. Just show up the first day for the WRAP plan training, so I reluctantly agreed.

The first day at Spring City Corner Clubhouse for the first day of Peer Support Specialist training featuring the WRAP training, I showed up. I was still not convinced to take the full 75 hour training. I remember the instructor, Carmen Bonanno greeted me. She asked with a sparkle in her eye, “Did you come for the 75 hour course?” I told her “No, I am just here for the WRAP training, today only.” That is when she gave me the most beautiful smile and said “Sign up for the Peer Specialist course and I will help you every step of the way.” With a glow in her eyes that melted my heart, she gave me the words that I needed to hear to sign up for the full 75 hour course.

Ironically, not only did I successfully complete and pass the course including receiving the stipend, I found out I scored the highest score of the class on the final exam. From going from total fear of failure to becoming the leader of the class helped me to believe in myself even though I had a mental illness. From there I went on to have a successful year of employment at Waukesha Mental Health Association as an operator on the Peer Support warm line much like Safe Harbor. Then I recruited to work 6 years with St. Aemilan-Lakeside Recovery Center in Waukesha, WI where I became a Wisconsin State Certified Peer Specialist between 2011-2015. Since moving to Omaha, NE I set my sights on taking the Community Alliance Peer Specialist Training Program and to take the Nebraska State Certified Peer Support Specialist Exam so I can continue my work in Omaha, Nebraska.

Artist's Way, Mohican

Women of the Dawn

Poetry
Woman of the Dawn
Wabun-Anung (Morning Star)
I am the heart of my family,
I am the center of my community
I carry the nation on my back
I carry the life of tomorrow in my soul.
I rise above the violence.
Bones heal. Bruises fade. My fear I face.
The rage I channel to protect myself.
To protect my children.
I walk away from the destruction
with my Great Creator by my side.
I am the one who can change the tide.
I am the one who will say STOP!
No more forever.
For I am the Woman of the Dawn
I rise with the morning sun.
Blazing with light, love, and hope.
I hold the future within me.
Image
Artist's Way

Mahican Beadwork at the National Museum of the American Indian Cultural Resource Center

Image
Wenona Morning Star Gardner of the Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation uncovering Mahican beadwork at the National Museum of American Indian Cultural Resource Center in Suitland, Maryland

As part on my Breath of Life Archival Institute of Indigenous Languages experience, I had the privilege to visit the National Museum of American Indian Cultural Resource Center (CRC) in Suitland, Maryland. The CRC, is home to the extensive collections and research programs of the museum. While at the CRC, I uncovered Mahican and Munsee baskets, bowls, mortar and pestles, as well as beadwork. As a beader myself, I am especially fond of beadwork so in this post I wanted to highlight some of the photos of my favorite Mahican beadwork that I had the chance to see.

I learned from L. Frank Manriquez that the purpose of surrounding ourselves with the original items of our people like our beadwork is because it helps with connecting to our native language. Since our old items and beadwork contain the memory of our language, if we were able to hold them you can feel that memory of our language of our people.

Image
Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

Image
Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

Image
Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

Image
Mahican beadwork. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

Image
Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

Image
Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

Image
Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 4220 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, Maryland 20746. (2013) Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

Artist's Way, Mohican

Sacred Journey with Owl

NMAI OWLS
Owls created from various tribes at the National Museum of American Indian in Washington DC

On June 7, 2013 I left for a 2 week trip for the Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages in Washington DC. While in DC, I searched the Library of Congress and Smithsonian Institute Archives searching for the Mahican and Munsee languages of my Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation. While I was riding on the train from Chicago to DC, I spotted an owl in broad daylight flying over a children’s playground in Chicago. I took that as a very important sign from the Creator.
At the National American Indian Museum I wheeled past in my wheel chair and randomly noticed a display of Owls made from various tribes. A couple days later while in my wheel chair, I was rolling through the National Museum of Natural History just quickly passing through by random chance I encountered another display of Owls without even trying to look for them. In my research at the National Anthropological Archives in Maryland I discovered a Mahican story in Mahican called The Owl Story. This is the original version of The Owl Story August 4, 1914 and was in Linguist Truman Michelson’s papers of a story told in English by Mohican Sot Quinney and then is translated into Mahican by Mohican William Dick which is the most accurate version of the story. I felt extremely honored to touch Michelson’s original papers handwritten in Mahican. According to Breath of Life Eastern Algonquian Linguist Conor Quinn who spoke to Linguist and Algonquian Language Specialist Ives Goddard, Quinney and Dick worked cooperatively on The Owl Story plus the six other Mahican stories I uncovered and both deserve credit. Within The Owl Story I learned the Mahican word for owl which is Mcō’ksasan.

Owl display at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC
Owl display at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC

According to the National Museum of American Indian This Day in the Mayan calendar , I learned corresponding with “June 25, 2013, is 8 Kame. Kame is the Owl and the recognition of death; 8 is a double balance. A day that recalls the night, tranquility, and silence, Kame is a good day to ask for the ancient and recent ancestors who have gone on, to thank them and remember them with purpose. Without fear, it is a good day to approach the spiritual dimension, ‘the enchantment.’”
Personally, I have associated the Owl representing the keeper of hidden knowledge and it seems most fitting to me as I explored the National Anthropological Archives in Maryland. I associate Owls with wisdom and spirituality which I perceive my Breath of Life journey to be focused on. I spent from February to June preparing myself spiritually with regular prayers and ceremony for the healing journey of Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages. I even invited my community to pray with me as I included them in a Breath of Life Prayer Circle. As I shared my research with my online tribal group Mohican-8 I attempted to make Breath of Life a community project so that they too were part of the process of uncovering hidden knowledge about our Mohican people. Owl also indicated to me the connection to our ancestors and I felt that as I touched the old papers in the archives that were handwritten with Mahican words.
I have been surrounded by Owl medicine during and after my Breath of Life journey. I am blessed to be in touch with the spirit world and by searching the archives to discover hidden knowledge. I am grateful the Owl has come with me on this sacred journey. I feel blessed.
Anushiik,
Wenona Morning Star Gardner
Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation

Artist's Way

The Breath of Life Prayer Circle.

Image

The Breath of Life Prayer Circle.

I am coming to you asking for prayer support as I go on my journey to the Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages in Washington DC. I will be searching the archives of the Library of Congress and Smithsonian Institute searching for Mahican and Munsee languages from my tribe. I will be going to Washington DC June 7-June 22, 2013. I am requesting that you regularly provide your prayers both before, during, and after my trip. I need prayers before I go to get ready for my journey. I definitely need prayers as I am actually traveling during June 7- June 22 since I am physically disabled and traveling poses special challenges for me. I will need prayers to help me locate and find hidden knowledge in the archives. I also need prayers to help me retrieve the information and bring it safely back to my tribe the Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation and the rest of the Lenape Nations. Most importantly I need prayers so that the information I get can be implemented and properly put into use.

Prayers that can be shared so that I can see them when I am in Washington DC would be much appreciated. I would like to see prayers written, pictures created, video of songs or music playing posted so I can view and hear them while I am on the road. I appreciate if you chose to pray silently and I am grateful for that. However, I am especially asking for prayers that I can see and hear while I am actually in Washington DC. Please post your prayers so I can be inspired and lifted as I take on the challenge of this intense two weeks.

I am grateful for you being part of my Breath of Life Prayer Circle. I am grateful for all and any prayers. I look forward to see what prayers you have to share.

Anushiik Thank you!

Wenona Morning Star Gardner
Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation

Artist's Way

Wiping Away the Tears

Image

Wiping Away the Tears

I am enrolled in the Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation and I was in foster care for a few years. I was told that Native American people who were adopted or went through foster care were considered “Lost Birds.” A longtime mentor brought me to a special ceremony called the Wiping Away the Tears ceremony at Indian Summer Festival during September 2002. The ceremony was part of that Indian Summer Festival’s theme “Coming Home,” which extended honor and healing to Indian adoptees and Indians that were in foster homes. Lakota Chief Arvol Looking Horse Keeper of the White Buffalo Calf Pipe performed the “Wiping Away the Tears” describes the special emphasis the “Wablenica Ceremony”, prayer and pipe ceremony, American Indian adoptees and foster care children are welcomed back to Native culture and their spiritual home. This ceremony also helped families who were separated by adoption or foster care begin the reconciliation process. The Wiping of Tears Ceremony to heal the grief caused by the years of separation from their families and communities. The entire ceremony for all of us Lost Birds in a circle praying and singing together. I hope, if you haven’t had a chance to participate in one, that you have the opportunity to participate in such a ceremony, it’s been very healing and life altering experience for me. 

Wenona Morning Star Gardner
Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation