Native American Witch

Native American Witches Growing

As the amount of witches is growing and at an all time high, so is growing Native American Witches. Skipper Gill is Lakota and a Native American Witch who leads a circle of witches and teaches classes on witchcraft. Skipper also sees within his witch’s circle an increasing amount of Native American Witches. “Well, I originally walked a Wiccan neopagan path but it didn’t feel like I was being true to myself. Then, I started truly studying Native American nature symbols, stories,and ceremonies. I realized how much it basically complimented my beliefs as a witch. I felt it was my true path,” said Skipper Gill. Skipper Gill says he sees within his circle over the years more and more Native American Witches.“That is true. It has a lot to do with people searching for a connection outside of organized religion. However I feel Hollywood is making us a little more mainstream now with Charmed reboot, Sabrina the Teenage witch, American Horror Story: Coven, etc.” says Skipper.

Waapan Alaangweew is a Native American Witch High Priestess of the Oneida Nation who has been leading Native American Witch Circles for over 30 years and she says “Over the last few decades I have seen more and more Native American Witches coming forward seeking spiritual fulfillment and a strong desire to heal Mother Earth.” Waapan started her healing journey in 1991 and has since walked the Red Road and the Magickal road combined. “We are part of the generation of the Eighth Fire prophecy where we must choose either the path of destruction or the path of creation led by Native Americans. The path of the Native American Witch is of positive creation and healing. People are at a time seeking of spiritual meaning and fulfillment. Now is the time,” says Waapan.

Witches Dance
Photograph Copyright Wenona Lee Gardner

Medicine Wheel

The Medicine Wheel is both practiced in Native American culture and also among witches. There are similarities of Celtic culture and Native American traditions that have a lot of similarities. There is a UWM prestigious paper discussed while sitting in the American Indian Student Services Office. The writer went into great detail of his comparisons which one of the topics he went into was the similarity of both culture’s traditions in regards to both be being based on a clan system.

Smudging

The act of using sage, cedar, and sweet grass is used by many Native Americans and Witches. Sage and cedar provides protection, sweet grass brings blessings, and tobacco is for prayer. Witches have their own use of sacred aromatic smoke for ritual cleansing purposes as well that come from their own long cultural traditions. The practice of cleansing with sacred smoke the same way. So it is very natural as as a Witch who also happens to be Native American to continue to use sacred smoke in their spiritual practice.

Witches Dance
Photograph Copyright Wenona Lee Gardner

Native American Witch Circle

There is a circle of over 789 witches in a group called Native American Witches. This Circle has grown rapidly in such a short time. More Native American Witch Circles have appeared across the country becoming more and more visible. Witchcraft Circle Leader Skippy Gill says, “That many are curious about witchcraft…Witchcraft at it’s core is an honorable craft of healing and respecting the earth. I teach the craft mainly to get that message out.”

Native American Witch

Storytelling Heals Movement

Native Hope is a nonprofit organization that created a movement among the Native American community promoting the healing process through storytelling hence the formation of Storytelling Heals. The Storytelling Heals movement was first launched during the National Native American Heritage Month. Since then there has been an outpouring of Native American Stories throughout the country of written and oral stories via video. The Storytelling Heals Movement is very important for Native American people whose voices are not heard in mainstream media or there is misinformation perpetuated by negative stereotypes.

In Native American culture Native Americans form a circle to share stories for healing. Stories share trauma through the generations to help other trauma survivors find connection and transform pain into healing. Through stories can also highlight Native American heroes and inspire hope. Each person in a talking circle gets a chance to share their personal story to speak from the heart to form healthy bonds with other Native Americans. Native Hopes’s #StorytellingHeals goal is healing and empowerment. Native Hope wants to generate funds to host Healing Circles for Native People.

Native American Journalist Tailyr Irvine from the Salish and Kootenai Tribal Nations is working hard to overcome harmful Native American stereotypes through her focus on real stories directly from Native American people through stories and visuals. Growing up Tailyr noticed the lack of good representative Native American stories which motivated her to stop complaining about it and moved her to become a Native American Journalist. Tailyr was one of the leading Native American Journalists at Standing Rock and is featured at Native Photograph.

If interested in learning more about Native American stories by Native Americans one can go the website of the Library of Congress and search the catalog at. An example of Native American stories you can find in the Library Congress catalog is from the Mohican Tribe the Mohican Seminar 1 : the continuance, an Algonquian Peoples Seminar including selected research papers, 2000 / edited by Shirley W. Dunn at
Inside you will find “The ancient Mohicans in time, space, and prehistory” by Edward V. Curtin. and “ Mohican/Algonquian settlement patterns” by Lucianne Lavin.

You can also get the original Native American stories directly from the Mohican tribe‘s government tribal website at where you can learn directly from the Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Tribe’s origin story. Since Native American Tribes are Sovereign Nations you can go the over 633 Federally recognized and State tribal governments to learn the tribal stories of Native American people. Become part of the Storytelling Heals Movement.

Native American Witch

“Path of the Morning Star” Dedications

I am dedicating my book “Path of the Morning Star” a book of hope for artists from a Native American perspective to my all time favorite teacher Mr. Gabe Ceci. Mr Ceci was my 9th grade Honors English Teacher and Home Room Teacher from Riverside University High School. Mr Ceci blew me away with his amazing storytelling of Odyesseus acting out all the roles in front of the entire class. He drilled in my head the poem Invictus by William Ernest Henley “I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul” which really has been a driving force of my entire life. I once was in a dire situation at home. Mr Ceci really listened to me and he rescued me so I could have a better chance in my life. He invested in me from his own pocket making sure I had glasses so I could see the words on the chalkboard. Even years later he took the time to read my Two Step story. I am happy to announce thanks to Mr Ceci on July 30 I am starting a Media Journalism Master’s of Fine Arts at Full Sail University. I aspire to be a powerful voice for the Native American community. My love for writing was nurtured by Mr Ceci which inspired me to make writing a book to get published a lifetime goal. My dream is to earn enough money from my writing so I can write him a big fat check to personally thank him for the enormous positive life changing influence he has had made me, my writing, and my entire life. I owe so much of the goodness in my life to Mr Ceci. Thank you Mr Ceci.

I am dedicating my book “Path of the Morning Star” inspiring hope to artists from a Native American perspective to Ann Leinfelder Grove. Ann had a major impact on my career when she encouraged me to present a Talking Circle on Historical Trauma of Native Americans by focusing on the Wellbriety Journey created by White Bison founded from my tribe Mohican Elder Don Coyhis during the Waukesha Trauma Informed Care Committtee. Ann recruited me to serve on Saint Aemilian-Lakeside’s Trauma Informed Care Committee. Ann granted me the opportunity to perform my Native American flute during the 160th Anniversay of Saint Aemilian Lakeside Inc which I received an Essential Piece Award. Ann invited me to represent Saint Amelian-Lakeside, Inc during the Trauma Informed Care Conference in Stevens Point, WI. Through her leadership in Trauma Informed Care while I was working at Friendships Unlimited she supported me becoming a Wisconsin State Certified Peer Support Specialist which has opened many doors for me. Ann’s dedication and commitment is a major reason Saint A is the leader in Trauma Informed Care today. Thank you Ann.

I am dedicating my book “Path of the Morning Star” inspiring hope to artists from a Native American perspective toTim Grove. Tim personally recruited me to serve on Saint Aemilian-Lakeside’s Trauma Informed Care Committee which I won an Essetial Piece Award for Team Work during the 7 years I served as a Certified Peer Support Specialist. Tim supported me to perform my Native American flute during the 160th Anniversay of Saint Aemilian Lakeside Inc which I received another an Essential Piece Award. Tim invited me to his team to represent Saint Amelian-Lakeside, Inc during the Trauma Informed Care Conference in Stevens Point, WI.
Tim’s thorough training in Trauma Informed Care had a major impact on my career which lead me to present a Talking Circle on Historical Trauma of Native Americans by focusing on the Wellbriety Journey created by White Bison founded from my tribe Mohican Elder Don Coyhis during the Waukesha Trauma Informed Care Committtee.
Through Tim’s leadership in Trauma Informed Care has opened many doors for me. Tim”s dedication and commitment is a leading reason Saint A is the leader in Trauma Informed Care today in the industry. Thank you Tim.